Luxury Automakers Using New Methods to Make Sales

November 30, 2012
Luxury Car

landrover.com

The typical procedure that most Miami buyers of mid-range vehicles are accustomed to is heading over to the nearest dealer of a particular model and make. From there, a salesman approaches the interested buyer, flashes a smile, shakes his hand, and goes on to help the client make an informed purchasing decision.

This traditional method of selling cars has worked for decades, but there’s also a good chance that potential customers will walk out. Luxury automakers, on the other hand, have evolved their salesmanship tactics to higher, and costlier, levels.

Such strategies are implemented by premier manufacturers such as Land Rover – this automaker recently previewed its newest Range Rover to 22 select guests at a $125 million estate, which is owned by a wealthy client of the automaker.

After getting close-up views of the ride, guests were then treated to a scrumptious, and expensive, meal prepared by one of Southern California’s most prominent restaurants. Body guards were also placed around the area, while other additional niceties, such as wine and champagne, were given to invitees.

Making such preparations will most definitely cost a lot, and maybe perceived a little irrational considering how there’s a possibility that the guests won’t be buying the vehicle when it comes out, but members of Land Rover’s head office say that every penny spent is worth it.

“The biggest part is understanding these customers,” said Kim McCullough, brand vice president for Land Rover, U.S. “This isn’t about a TV ad or some Twitter message to these people. It’s about good old-fashioned on-the-ground speaking to them.”

Companies like Land Rover stress the importance of developing strong, personal relationships with their clients. So if that means treating them to extravagant dinners at the finest restaurants, exclusive golf outings, or upscale events in tony locales, they’ll do it.

Tactics like these are vastly different from the impersonal methods used by traditional salesmen. The goal sought by luxury automakers is to make their customers feel that they’re not just buying a car, but becoming a part of a club wherein members are handpicked.

Other luxury car manufacturers are playing the exact same game in fear of getting left behind competition.

Earlier this year, Lexus had a series of catered dinners at various customers’ homes across the country. Mercedes-Benz reportedly hosts its clients at the James Beard Foundation gourmet dining experience, and grants them exclusive access into its “Star Lounge” during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week events in New York.

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